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at the present surplus on education reform. this event is about 45 minutes. [applause] first we think you very much for joining us. i know you've had a couple of busy days from last evening jon stewart to this morning cnn.com appears morgan coming and we are delighted to have our wonderful friends here from c-span filming this event that many people across the united states can really benefit from a lot of what michelle has to say. to kickstart the seasoning how did you come up with a fascinating and interesting book and where does this interesting name come from? >> i think the genesis of the name is interesting in that when i first got to d.c., it was the lowest performing and most dysfunctional school district in the entire nation to be the was a pretty widely known truth. and so, i started doing things that i thought were obvious for school district in that kind of state and started closing the low performing schools, moving out and effective employees, cutting the central office board of bureaucracy in half and as i was taking all these steps and measures, people started saying she's a ra
of the education until system. this is a half an hour. >> it's great to see so many people out tonight who do such amazing work for kids in new orleans, and thank you for coming. i'm just going to talk for about 10 or 15 minutes or so and then take questions, and there's some people here tonight who are in the book and they might be willing to answer your questions during that session as well if you're interested in hearing what it was like to be part of that process from their van -- vantage point. the other day is was reading a book called "behind the beautiful forever," which tells the story of a group of families living in a mumbai slum, and in her author's note she tries 0 explain why she chose to focus on ordinary people rather than broader policy debates or history, and she wrote something that i think summarizes what i happened to do and hope against hope getter than i ever could. she wrote, when i settle into a place, listening and watching, i don't try to fool myself that the stories of individuals are themselves arguments. i just believe that better arguments may be even better pol
to send her to college in a day and age when women weren't educated. as frances is growing up, cleveland's relationship with her changes, changes from uncle cleve, the godfather, to a romantic interest. cleveland starts sending her letters with poems and sends her roses, and it's the full court press on courting her. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv. and now former florida governor jeb bush argues that the nation's immigration policy should be overhauled to reflect our current economic needs, but also should be b clear enough to enforce properly. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> now, our love whered president finish beloved president ronald reagan passed away almost ten years ago. but as many in this audience know, it seems nearly impossible to follow political news without hearing some reference to our 40th president. his memory, his name and, fortunately, his legacy seem to be ubiquitous as our country grapples with the challenges of our time. for many years, probably starting with the day after president reagan left
the education and i think that they are generally more serious student and demand more from all of us in the classroom. >> host: in our look how to succeed in college, you have a chapter, sub chapter the liberal ivory tower. can a conservative student -- can a student who is conservative be successful, out of harvard, an american? >> guest: absolutely. let's go back and take that turn in the book to dispel the myth. these are not a bastion of liberalism that are unfriendly to conservatives. what we are s after if i'm doing my job right any student who comes in here is going to have his preexisting who views challenged whether they are liberal or conservative those kids are going to be challenged to think about what they really believe in, taken the information that we are leaving and leave with their own view in the world. if i am doing my job right that is what is happening to it and that ought to be both exciting and probably to some extent little frightening to students, no matter what their political selective is because ultimately we want them to be critical consumers of informat
, or the end of men. more women than men get a college education, women are for the first time in the majority in the workplace, in managerial positions. so it's very hard for us to look back to that other time. and i was, you know, even though abstractly understand that things were different, we don't know, um, we we can't really see and feel it exactly. i interviewed janet malcolm for the paris review, and she told me that when she was in college, she had not a single woman professor. and i was just shocked. even though i know that life was like that, it was kind of astonishing to me. so my first question i was going to ask our two panelists who were alive for the feminine mystique to just describe for a moment one, um, your experience when you first read the book, and it is overblown or exaggerated to say that this book changed people's lives? >> oh, i don't think there's any question. i mean, of course, it changed people's lives. it's till changing people's lives. it is passed down true the culture. and it was the greatest social revolution probably since the suffragists. and that movement
he calls the pharmacy. he believes education needs to be cared. a lot of people in lower and higher education are essentially the same thing that we should be spending our first teaching people how to find stuff, how to find information. this is different from knowing things. so if i took all the electricity away and there's a blackout, yet no electricity for weaker to me can ask my students if your devices don't work, what do you know? the answer is they'll tell me not much because i need to be a defined as. studies done by psychologists in which she said if you ask people to do a google search and later you ask them what they found, they're better at remembering how they thought the search path and they are remembering the content. someone if it happens to bless google, i couldn't live without it. what it's doing is redefining what it means to know. if you students raised not just because it ologies, people in education say we should learn how to do things. one should be part of the 21st century generation so we raising a generation of people to believe what matters is you can fin
she's tried to influence the education policy and i enjoy talking with her and even more so the older sister who had gone to india to become involved with children who would not have had an education and all the issues related to that. i thought this was interesting and worst doing so i decided the best option was to offer myself to become a nun so at the age of 17 i spoke to the reverend mother to say i decided to become a nun. she said think about it. go away for a year then be will receive you. my parents were very happy with my choice because i honored to be a nun and they're happy to have me another year. they decided nothing was too good for their daughter said they thought they would send me to paris for one year. [laughter] that changed everything. [laughter] i describe that in detail in the book. [laughter] and they came under a different influence. i had a grandfather retired earlier and what he practiced with the pork guy against the landlord and he was pleased to have a young girl who was interested in what he was talking about. he did not know how to speak to a child and
the public education system based on the progressive theories of john dewey. the compatriots' railed against the memorization and that children should read and write and do sums on their own timetable and that was even harmful to force them to do it faster. she believed their emotional development was as important as their intellectual development and she said that most important thing that a school could do is get children into the habit of being happy. most importantly, she believed come and her fellow progressive educators believed that a school must instill in children's minds the ability to think independently so that they could participate fully in the american democracy. in 1932, he elizabeth irwin's class's or at p.s. 41 which most of you probably know is on west 11th street, and it still is in the village. the city at that point withdrew its funding from the experiment and the parents were so upset that their children wouldn't be able to take class with elizabeth warren that they banded together and something that's famous at a parent's ice cream parlor they got together the money o
of the and he calls it inform the see that education, he is not alone in this they're saying the same thing that we suspend our efforts teaching people how to find stuff for information on the internet it is different from knowing things. the fight took all the electricity away we have a blackout i said if your devices don't work what do you know, ? they will say not much because i need to be able to find things it is published last year that if you ask people to do a google search than later ask them what they found, there better remembering how they followed the search path they're remembering the contents. so these technologies, plus kugel maybe i could live without it but it is redefining what it means to no. not just because of technology but people in education say we should learn how to use these. we are raising a generation of people to believe it is not what you know, or how you analyze the argument or who you are but that worries me incredibly. >> host: what is your view on the pbs? >> guest: some faculty members say over my dead body to use wikipedia it is a fascinating experime
. and partly because having grown up in new york city as i will tell you with a very inadequate education he was not capable of writing a thank you note. so if his wife was unable to do for him and she would almost everything, if she couldn't do for him he didn't do it because his spelling was phonetic german accent spelling. his handwriting can only be described as horrible. so people often want to know how i came to write about thomas nast and it's a story that originated in gretchen school in california, where i was contributing material for an encyclopedia and produced by my visor, and i chose his name off of a list thinking it would be entertaining. and then my what to look for me to about him i couldn't find any and i thought i'm the world's worst graduate student and they should take me out. i called by pfizer and said i don't know what i'm doing. she said let me look. she looked and she said it's fine, it's not you. there is nothing about him. so it turns out that what existed at that time was a biography published in 1904 by albert bigelow paine who is a newspaper writer for childre
not supporting the party, but they also knew there was no access or very limited access to elite higher education, that there was very little electoral representation, that there was extreme poverty, that there was not representation on the police force or in the political parties, they knew they didn't want the young activists who were standing up and doing something to get kill inside their bed and that that was of a threat to them as well. what the party did was articulate politics that not only drew support from more moderate black politics, but also drew support from other nonblack groups in the united states and internationally, and that support was crucial to being able to sustain on self-defense and the revolutionary imperialism of the black panther party as a source of power for change. i'm going to run through a few sort of examples of some of the allies here. this is, um, the young lords apparently, a puerto rican organization that emulated the black panther party in new york after they took over. they wanted to run a breakfast program and ended up doing a big takeover of a church in t
. they also knew that given there was no or very limited access to the higher education there was little representation and there was not representation on the police force of the fire departmendepartmen t or political parties. they knew they didn't want the young activists who were standing up and doing something and that was a threat to them as well. with the party did was articulate politics that not only choose support from more moderate black politics but also choose support from other non-black in the united states and internationally and that outlet support was crucial to be able to sustain self-defense and the anti-imperialism of the black panther party as a source of power for change. i'm going to run through a few examples of some of the allies here. this is the young party of puerto rican organization that emulated the black panther party in new york after they took over. they ended up having to take over a church in their neighborhood. working with many church members because they couldn't get space to run their breakfast program and it ended up that they got a lot of support
on the. another area where people are educated. it can make a difference just like educating people with regards to the deficits were facing and that deficit supposedly help the economy. before i get into this, we both taught at the university of chicago law school. the first time i met him i introduced myself and say you are the kind of guy. as idiotic as silk. and i had no he would help me out with the city of chicago since i'd heard that. they said maybe we can get together for lunch sometime. but he kind of wrinkled his face, turned his back to me and walked away and that was the end of our first conversation. i have to say rinne two and 20 other times and it's pretty much the way all our conversations went. it is not thinking i would be getting christmas cards or anything else from him. i was not as a retired part of it is that got the strong impression when i would run into him that he viewed me as evil because of the gun issue. he had very strong opinions on the. [inaudible] [laughter] i'd found something on the gun issue he disagreed very strongly about and he viewed me as e
and have sort of a self-directed education that on some foundational level are really important and that's critical thinking i think the best things my own education gave me. i think it's increasingly hard to sort of live up to that ideal, just with the burdens placed on schools today, surrounding standardized testing, and standardized testing is something i have incredibly milked feelings about. i feel like we need to have a way of measuring school progresses and schools that persistently fail kids over years and generations, need to be held accountable to that. but it also makes it very hard for schools to develop and sustain vibrant art programs and music programs and to kind of have the educational offers that reach the appeal of tie versety of kids out there. i don't envy school administrators for having to figure that all out. does that answer your question? >> if you don't hey -- you don't have any further questions, thank you for the great presentation. [applause] >> in 1978, steven hess surveyed 450 journalists covering the federal government for u.s. news organizations. over 30
the polarized the geological lead as we bring to bear. what did we achieve in education or environmentalism or what's not and in that sense, mayors suggests their accessibility to us but ultimately the real question is army is not in vulnerable to influence? our mayors on the side of big money or not? as compared to what? what in the world system? my view is mayors and councilors and citizens of cities are a great place to start because cds around world remain more cosmopolitan and open and tolerant and floral and more creative than the alternative entities at the state and national level. why not make a bet on them? we bet on the nation's state for 400 years and i am not sure in the 20 first century that that is paying off? lana please democratic that on the city for a while lands see what they can do? is worth making that bet. >> turn it over to the audience. listen. i said that when i had the opportunity. when it is on the ballot by a vote for the parliament of mayors. i went on to say some of the things that could not accomplish, would not accomplish, some of the terrible obstacles the
it features over forty venders and exhibiters, a children educational area, and 5 authorities and -- 45 authors and poets scheduled. booktv will be live from the los angeles times festival of books. checkbook tv.org for live coverage. let us now about your area. we'll post them. post them to our wall or e-mail us. for me something so right, dear, so necessary before we got in trouble as students as young people we studied. we just didn't wake up one morning and said we're going sit in. we didn't just dream one day that we're going to come to washington and go on the freedom ride or march on washington like 1963 we were going march as we did in 1965. we studied. we prepared ourself. >> intimidated so many people white people in particular by using that phrase. black power. because when they use the word or the phrase black power it made many think that black power meant destruction. blowing up the statute liberty or ground zero. destroying america. it wasn't anything about destroying america. it was about rebuilding america and having america to have a new paradigm in terms of
of world war i, so they thought to make up for the loss and interruption of their education, thegd send them all to university for six months just to round out their education. blackett was sent to cambridge, and he said one day i wandered over to the cavendish laboratory to see what a scientific lahr story was like, and very shortly after that he told the navy i want to become a scientist. he never did receive a ph.d., but he quickly became one of the world's foremost physicists for the work he did in the 1930s discovering the positive terror, the positive electron, the first piece of antimatter whose existence was confirmed. he would win the nobel prize in physics in 1948. he was good looking, had an extraordinary combination of hands-on ability and theoretical imagination. his colleagues remarked they'd never known anyone his equal in his ability to conceive of a problem in physics, write out a few lines of mathematics, design an ap apparatus, build it himse, carry out the experiment, analyze the results. he was also one of a number of scientists in britain and america who had been w
to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise, so in honor of dr. king and all of those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we'll commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration, a movement of education, not inv. cation, a movement for jobs, not jails, a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights to work, to shelter, to food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? well, first i believe we got to begin by telling the truth, the whole truth, and admit out loud that we as a nation created a cap-like system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the truth in the schools, in our churches, in our places of worship, behind bars, and in reentry centers. we've got to be willing to tell this truth so that a great awakening to the reality of what has occurred can come to pass because the reality is is that this new cap-like system doesn't come with signs. there are no whites only signs anymore. there are no signs alerting u
, it educates and it moves us. it even angers us and painfully reminds us of all the hatred and injustice so many of our citizens endured at the hands of their fellow countrymen. and today just as i was at their teen years old i'm still an off how these two great men took a chance and risked so much to stand up for literally millions of people. when i look at that photo and after reading dr. carlo' book i'm reminded of the notion that nothing endures more than your character. and the simple yet daunting question of how you want to be remembered. he was one of our host earlier today and summed it up and he said even long after john carlos is physically gone his influence will be very much alive in that iconic photo. nothing could be a more revered legacy. in the case of dr. carlo's he spent only two and a half pages of this entire book describing his actual 200-meter bronze medal race, his enduring character has transcended the memory of that medal for he has so many other things to be proud of. here are just a few of them. his harlem upbringing, his 200-meter world records, being inducted in
movement to a human rights movement. the movement for education. a movement for jobs. a movement to end all of these forms of legal discrimination against people. discrimination that denies basic human rights. to work and to shelter. so what can we do to begin this movement? first, we have to begin by telling the truth we have to be willing this new caste like system doesn't come with signs. and there are no signs alerting us to the existence of systems of massive incarceration. prisons are out of sight and out of mind. often hundreds of miles away from communities and families that might otherwise be connected. the people who cycle in and out of these prisons live in segregated and impoverished communities. communities that middle-class folks and upper-middle-class folks rarely come across. so you can live your whole life in america. pull back the curtain and make visible the students in plain sight. so that an awakening can begin. and people can begin to take the kind of creative and constructive action that this moment in our history surely requires people want to escape the system. bein
but people who have more education those of ph.d. tend to be more liberal most of us who are college professors have decided money is not the most important thing because you do other things but that said whenever ideologies if we are doing our jobs our students don't know that the best compliment i ever got was one who had no idea until she babysat my kids is on the bumper sticker on my wife's car because what a good professor does is take his or her background out of the conversation. it isn't about us and our job is to challenge them. >> host: does 10 your help students? >> i hope -- to think it helps the faculty to be successful with that day of the question what does tenure get? freedom of inquiry to look at we think is important without worrying about somebody looking over our shoulder to say that is the unpopular idea if we are worried about that and we would not understand gravity or the world is spherical but that is what tenure gets us or faculty to do a full inquiry to grow the knowledge and science because students could participate in the research projects so if i want m
, with a saudi family. the parents have been educated in the u.s., and they took me on a picnic out in the desert. and at the end of the evening, the family was praying the final prayer of the day. and i was sitting on a rug, and at the end of that, their six-year-old son came to me and he said, i need to teach you something. and i said, sure. and he said, do you know what to say when the angel of death comes? and he could tell i did not. so he proceeded, and he said, he says, who is your god? and you say allah. and then he says who is your profit? and you said mohammed. what is your faith? and you say islam. what are your works? and you said i heard an ugly. and muslims apparently believe that this great interview occurs immediate after you're buried, and if you been a good muslim and properly answer these questions, you are born aloft and shown a window on heaven, and then go back in your grave to await judgment day. and if you have not been a good muslim and cannot properly answer these questions, you are pulverized and put back together and pulverized and put back together for eternity, until
with these people in different cultures and subcultures with the education, it helped to crystallize the concept of winter political change from the nationalists to international perspective for i saw the struggle at home. and rather vilifying white men began to criticize the space structure of rich white men. a change that proved invaluable and then as the war organizer later on. >> this is the big take away that the participants have. the opportunity to interact with folks that they did not have a chance to normally such as the appalachian whites they got them thinking and more sophisticated ways and a lot of people went to washington were relatively young teenagers and their 20s or 30s. there were older folks there but it was a majority of people who went to washington who stayed there for any period of time were younger. they had more time and did not have this kind of thinking form to through life yet the more important is the relationship between the chicano activists saying a great take away for them they got to meet people from the southwest even less angeles saying when when i have gott
if you'll give us a certain number of advantages, muse leanny, if you make education in the italian schools catholic, if you'll treat catholicism as the state religion of italy, then we'll set up a concordance with you, and you'll give us the status of a separate country. the van can is a separate country. it doesn't have any normal citizens, you know, no women citizens. it's got post offices and other signs of the government, but it's a fake government. it's a fantasy government. you know, it's kind of a disneyland government. [laughter] nobodiments to take -- nobody wants to take it away. my wife refused to go to the vatican after the first few times. it's got beautiful treasures in there, but it's a great fortress is great treasures inside, and everywhere, paintings of the donation of con stan tine, the mystical giving of worldly power to the pope, painting on chairs of the bishop peter, which he never was, coats of arms of all of the noble popes who took over in the renaissance, and she said, you know, what could be more against the gospel of jesus than this earthly trumpeting o
no sympathy for the brown v. board of education decision. when it was a crisis like little rock crisis, eisenhower did follow the law. he followed the constitution. he did what a five star general did. the hated this whole thing. anti-particularly didn't like adam clayton powell. he thought he was a demagogue. so i'm not sure what nixon's role in this, nixon was, you, nixon was very friendly with them because they kind of like each other. [inaudible] >> the issue was that he was actually influenced by advisers to him he won't be able to make a decisive decision not to include. so what i'm saying is that you feel as though nixon's personal politics towards african-americans during his administration were negatively affected by his advisors that surrounded him during that administration? >> i don't think the. you're talking presidents nixon, not vice president nixon spent but i'm talking about an event that happened during his vice presidential speeches are not aware of one or the other, i'm sorry. >> i think that richard nixon attitude towards african-americans were shaped by some assum
no, eisenhower was, had no sympathy for the brown v. board of education decision. he thought it was terribly disruptive to the society, and he -- when something, when there was a crisis such as the little rock crisis, eisenhower did follow the law, he followed the constitution. and he said -- he did what a five-star general did, he said overwhelming force, but he hated, he hated whole thing. and he particularly didn't like adam clayton powell who he thought was a demagogue. so i'm not sure what nixon, what nixon's role in this. mix son was, you know, nixon was very friendly with por row because they actually kind of liked each other, and that was a personal thing. >> well, the issue was that he was actually influenced by advisers to him in order to be able to make a decisive decision not to include him. so what i'm saying is do you feel as though nixon's personal politics towards african-americans during his administration were negatively affected by advisers that surrounded him during that administration? >> i don't think so. i mean, you're talking about president nixon, not
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)